Netflix PSA: Watch tonight

I am not a master of decision, and I waste a lot of (valuable) Netflix viewing time just looking for something to watch. I noticed Netflix kept recommending this film, What Maisie Knew, to me. The description is as follows:

“A perceptive 6-year-old girl becomes a bargaining tool when she gets caught in the midst of a toxic custody fight between her self-seeking parents.”

A child’s perspective of her parents divorce? No thanks. Initially I thought this movie looked sad and boring. Netflix persisted in its recommendation and I persisted in my stubborn belief that I don’t need to listen to some recommendation algorithm when I can sift through thousands of movies on my own. Eventually I grew weary and took the rec. 

The film shows the challenges of people who are peripherally attached and affected by a messy divorce. Inevitably, it is sad, but it’s not boring. Rather, it’s complex and kind of touching. If you’re looking for something to watch tonight, consider giving What Maisie Knew a try. 

actionables:

i need context

actionables:

i need context

(Source: la-tarte-aux-bananes, via badtvblog)

 

(Source: kelly-kapoor, via badtvblog)

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

(Source: stupidimagesforcraziestpeople, via badtvblog)

(Source: mrgolightly, via petboyfriend)

queencate:

Cate Blanchett’s back

(via suicideblonde)

(Source: longhornbambam, via badtvblog)

weareconstance:

Over the course of 2013, Eve Abrams interviewed dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. She asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of the seven-part radio documentary, Along Saint Claude.

Eve heard people talking about these changes in her neighborhood, and she wanted to listen more closely to what different people thought and felt about our community’s past, present and future.

You can stream the seven-part documentary from WWNO.

above: Portraits of Dan Eaglin, Joanne Livaccari Cieutat and Eppy Livaccari by Jonathan Traviesa.

(via npr)

defendneworleans:

David Byrne on his visit to New Orleans.  Read Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. 
Photo by David Byrne

defendneworleans:

David Byrne on his visit to New Orleans.  Read Part 1Part 2 and Part 3

Photo by David Byrne

nprmusic:

Watch the Pixies play “Monkey Gone to Heaven” and two new songs — one unreleased — at NPR’s Tiny Desk. 

nprmusic:

Watch the Pixies play “Monkey Gone to Heaven” and two new songs — one unreleased — at NPR’s Tiny Desk

(via npr)